ShoutSA 2012

There’s definitely some unfortunate timing here with the recent release (and subsequent social media storm) on Kony 2012.  When I first watched this video, I really liked it.  I think trying to speak to people through music is an excellent way & South Africa certainly has enough musical talent to pull this off.

But then I started thinking more about the video, and about its goals.  Who is ShoutSA?  What do they do with my R20?  How can a video support the fight against crime?  I took to searching around the interwebs for some of this information, and apparently the people at ShoutSA got the message because this is what I found:

You can also see a list of their donations on their website

Even if I’m still not clear how much money they’ve received in donations and sponsorship relative to the almost R600.000 they have donated over the last 2 years, at least I was able to find some information. (Although R600,000 seems like an awfully small number to me).

This message shared by Danny K, when speaking about crime in South Africa, certainly resonates with every South African

It’s easy to say it’s the other guy’s problem but until we understand that we are all in the same boat and if there’s a hole in the hull, we’re all going down!

and perhaps that’s why these videos are so popular.

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On Stop Kony 2012

If you have no idea what I’m talking about, go to twitter and search #Kony2012.

You can see the video that caused all the hype here: http://www.kony2012.com/

But you should also read this: Kony 2012 campaign: Oprah and bracelets won’t solve problem (from The Guradian via Bill Easterly)

And then to learn more about the group behind the video “Invisible Children” read this: Invisible Children: Saviors or Sensationalists

Then you can read this – In Defence of the @Kony12 campaign

Some more food for thought (via Jillian C York, HT: Laura Seay ):

If we say #Kony2012 is a good idea, then we’re approving an environment in which causes compete by production value. Like Hollywood.